Myth-busting: Flash Flooding

So you’re getting cozy with this fall-like weather and thoughts of hurricanes are the farthest from your mind. Rain? Blistering heat? What’s that? I know, I’ve been there. This is what we call weather denial: “the weather is absolutely perfect and it’s never going to change.” Many of you are delightfully proclaiming that it’s time for a pumpkin spice latte (granted, it’s always time for a pumpkin spice latte) and a good scarf. Well, on the bright side, autumn is not too far away. But because this is humid subtropical Columbia, South Carolina, we have some heat and rain to get through (yes, this cool spell will end, I’m afraid) before the leaves truly fall.

Maybe it’s that weather denial hitting strong, but this summer has seemed one of epic proportions for rain and storms. As we’re in the thralls of hurricane season, there’s plenty more where that came from. It’s time to get the facts straight. We’ve touched on lightning myths before, so next up is flash flooding.

Myth: Large cars and sports utility vehicles should be able to navigate in deeper flood waters.

Truth: Just two feet of swiftly moving flash flood water is enough to float most vehicles — even larger cars and trucks. My condolences to all my truck-driving, mud-sloshing Southern boys.

Myth: Flash floods occur only along rivers and streams.

Truth: Flash floods can occur nearly anywhere — even in urban areas.

Myth: Homeowners insurance policies cover flood damage.

Truth: The vast majority of these policies do not cover flood damage, so check your coverage!

*Photo credit: Yauheni Attsetski

Sandy Hayden

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